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Saturday, November 19, 2011

Today is my 21st birthday. As I share the date with the adorable Nancy Carroll, here are a few pics.

Illusion 1929


The Shopworn Angel

Sweetie with Stanley Smith

Sunday, October 23, 2011

Leather motorcycle jacket c. 1950s

Source: McCord Museum

Wednesday, October 12, 2011

Watchmen

Carla Gugino as Sally Jupiter/Silk Spectre in Watchmen

Scarlett Johansson in The Black Dahlia (2006)

Friday, September 30, 2011

Ralph Lauren RTW S/S 2012 NYFW

Lauren took the Great Gatsby in 1920s as his inspiration for Ralph Lauren’s Ready To Wear Spring/Summer 2012 New York Fashion Week. Beautiful, elegant and glamorous dresses from satin to chiffon represented in pastel hues, from ivory, blue, yellow, white and green to metallic but soft gives the feminine touch in floral prints from skirts to scarves. Hats, the open toe pumps and the other accessories make the collection more luxurious. And you can feel the spring from Ralph Lauren Spring/Summer 2012 Collection. It’s a lovely fashion show. Fresh and stunning. I love it.

Friday, September 9, 2011

1770s robe à l'Anglaise à la Polonaise reproduction


I am enamored with this 1770s robe à l'Anglaise à la Polonaise reproduction by The Aristocat. View more pictures and her description of it's construction here.

Sunday, September 4, 2011

Caraco and petticoat ca. 1770-1780

"This young woman's jacket (called a caraco in the 18th century) and matching petticoat are made of painted and dyed cotton fabric (chintz) produced in south-east India's Coromandel Coast for export to Europe in about 1770. The design is entirely hand-drawn, not printed. The red and blue colour scheme is achieved using the complex processes of resist-dyeing (for the blue) and mordant-dyeing (for the red), which also involve repeated stages of bleaching and rinsing. This fabric would have been brought to England by the East India Company as part of the immense trade in Indian textiles that was taking place. It was evidently made up into this stylish ensemble in about the 1770s. The caraco is ingeniously constructed. One T-shaped piece of cloth forms the back and the sleeves, which fold over the arm, forming a raglan sleeve in the front. The back is shaped using tucks rather than the more usual pleats or seams." Source: VAM

Saturday, September 3, 2011